Africa overland routes

From WikiOverland, the encyclopedia of Overland travel
Jump to: navigation, search

Heading South or Heading North?[edit]

The majority of overlanders tend to head South from Europe rather than North from Southern Africa. Either way, there are two major route options.

East Africa[edit]

The quick route from EU is to ferry across to Tunisia, enter Libya, and into Egypt. The hardest part about this route is the expensive Carnet de Passage requirements for taking a vehicle into Egypt. The second element of this route is the ferry into Sudan, which currently only takes six vehicles. Heading South after Sudan the journey becomes considerably easier. After Ethiopia, East Africa beckons with its fantastic people, animals and tar roads. At this point the journey South becomes easier and quicker especially if the main roads are followed.

West Africa[edit]

If you can speak French, then this route is a good option but don’t be put off by this. This route offers a combination of enjoying three languages on route – French, Portuguese and English. The route South from Europe involves a short ferry and then gently eases you into Africa after your first border crossing in Morocco. The route can be divided into two sections – first section finishing in Ghana and the second section starting after Ghana and ending in Namibia. A shipping option is available from Ghana to Southern Africa.

Central Africa[edit]

Currently limited information is available on these routes which were very popular leading up to 2000. The route roughly covered the following countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, and finally into East Africa.

Resources[edit]

Overland Live Blog